Dr David Glover

Posted in Conference 2012

Dr David Glover is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Southampton where he teaches courses on cultural theory, Irish literature, and Victorian and Edwardian literature and culture. He has taught at a number of universities in Britain, Canada, and the USA and has been a Resident Fellow at the Humanities Institute, State University of New York at Stony Brook (1992) and a Visiting Fellow at the American Bar Foundation, Chicago (2003). His books include Vampires, Mummies, and Liberals: Bram Stoker and the Politics of Popular Fiction (Duke University Press, 1996), Genders (with Cora Kaplan; Routledge, 2000 & 2009) and he has recently co-edited The Cambridge Companion to Popular Fiction (2012). His latest book Literature, Immigration, and Diaspora in Fin-de-siècle England: A Cultural History of the 1905 Aliens Act will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. He has twice served as Editor of new formations: a journal of culture/theory/politics (1997-2001 and with Scott McCracken 2004-8) and he is also an Advisory Editor for English, Text, Construction and The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies. He has contributed to The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Literature (2004), The New Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004), The Oxford History of the Novel in English (2010) and his essays have appeared in a wide range of journals and edited collections. His current research looks at the role of historical and literary representations in the transition to modern citizenship.

Prof. Logie Barrow

Posted in Conference 2012

Prof. Logie Barrow is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Bremen (Germany) where he has taught courses in British Social, Cultural and Political History, including “Sexualities in Britain from c.1500”, “Science and Religion c.1550-1950”, “Anglo-British Slavery”, “South-African History” and “the British and the Middle-East”. He has also taught at the University of East Anglia, Norwich. He has published numerous articles in journals and contributed with chapters to different anthologies on the social and political history of the English working-classes. His most out-standing publications are A [very] Short History of the British Labour Movement, 1969, London: Sheed and Ward; Independent Spirits: Spiritualism and English Plebeians, c. 1850-1910, 1986, London: Routledge; and Democratic Ideas and the British Labour Movement, 1880-1914, 1996, Cambridge: University Press (jointly with Dr Ian Bullock).

Professor Cora Kaplan

Posted in Conference 2012

Cora Kaplan is Honorary Professor of English at Queen Mary, University of London and Professor Emerita of English at Southampton University. In 2011-12 she is Senior Research Fellow at King’s College, University of London. From 1988-95 she held a chair in English at Rutgers University, New Brunswick where she was, from 1992-95, the Director of the Institute for Research on Women. A feminist cultural critic and theorist, with a special interest in class and race, her work has focused on questions of aesthetic and politics--in women’s writing in Britain from the late eighteenth century through the mid-Victorian period—and in fiction and film in the last fifty years. These issues were first brought together in Sea Changes: Essays on Cultural and Criticism (Verso, 1986), and later in Genders, co-authored with David Glover (Taylor and Francis, 2000; 2nd revised edition 2009). Her most recent book, Victoriana: Histories, Fictions, Criticism (Edinburgh UP and Columbia UP, 2007), continues this work. With Dr. Jennie Batchelor she is the general editor of a new 10 part series, the History of British Women’s Writing published by Palgrave MacMillan. The first five volumes of the series appeared in 2010-12. Two co-edited books, Harriet Martineau: Authorship Society and Empire (Manchester UP) and Imagining Transatlantic Slavery (Palgrave) were published in 2009. James Baldwin: America and Beyond (Michigan UP) co-edited with Bill Schwarz appeared in 2011. Her current project is a study of racial thinking and representation in nineteenth century Britain.

Angelita Reyes

Posted in Conference 2012

Angelita Reyes is a scholar/teacher in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University. Of American and Honduran background, she is the author of Mothering across Cultures: Postcolonial Representations, which received the Choice Outstanding Academic Title in Language and Literature award and nominated for the MLA William Sanders Scarborough Prize. With innovative research methodologies, her edited books and essays cover a range of topics that focus on women and public history, gender and sexuality, migrating subjects, and visualizing slavery in the Atlantic World. The recipient of numerous awards, grants, fellowships and honors, she is motivated by qualitative transformative indicators and ethics that center on the “human”—that which brings marginalized peoples and cultures to the centre. Through the U.S. Department of State’s program on public diplomacy, she was a humanities scholar in Kazakhstan, Central Asia where she lectured on women, ethnicity and music. A notable outcome of her State Department lecture tour is an essay on rap music in Kazakhstan that appears in Words Beats & Life: The Global Journal of Hip Hop Culture. Moreover, as an exhibition curator, she has coordinated and staged multi-media installations that visually communicate and translate her scholarship to academic and general audiences.